Lafayette Therapeutic and Deep Tissue Massage

THERAPEUTIC VS DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE

3205 Johnston St. Lafayette La 70503

337-909-0440

deep tissue massageTherapeutic Massages Deep Tissue Massage

At Louisiana Massage Therapy Clinic , we specialize in therapeutic massage, which for many people is synonymous with deep tissue massage. That makes sense because deep tissue massage is the most common of the therapeutic massage modalities—and if that’s what you’re looking for, you’ve come to the right place.

Therapeutic Massage vs Deep Tissue

Therapeutic massage is a general term that describes any type of massage modality that helps relieve pain, reduce stress, and work on a specific problem—such as a frozen shoulder. People tend to assume therapeutic massage means deep tissue massage, and that they will get a very strong massage. But this is not always the case. Deep tissue massage is great at breaking down scar tissue and getting your blood circulating, but it may not be what you need on a particular day. A good therapist will apply the specific techniques and the right amount of pressure to address your need, and sometimes that’s a lighter touch.

Types of Therapeutic Massage

There are several different types of therapeutic massage in addition to deep tissue massage, such as:

  • neuromuscular massage
  • myofascial massage
  • trigger point therapy
  • sports massage

Many therapists will use a combination of techniques depending on what your body needs. In addition, therapists will often take additional classes in different techniques.

Benefits of Deep Tissue Massage

Most of our clients are interested in deep tissue massage, and that makes sense because it is a great way to manage pain. Deep tissue massage—as well as the other therapeutic massage methods—can give you a lot of relief from chronic pain. Many of our clients come in for frozen shoulder treatment and neck pain—two side effects of working on computers all day.

Lafayette Therapeutic Massage

Deep Tissue Side Effects

Many people want to know what the side effects of deep tissue massage are. That’s a great question, and it varies from person to person—and it can even vary for you depending on what’s going on in your body the day you get a massage. Typically, people may feel more muscle soreness for a day or two after the massage, especially if the therapist gives you a strong massage. A deep tissue massage shouldn’t cause horrible pain—and if it does you need to tell your therapist you need less pressure. However, if they’ve been working your muscles, you will probably feel it as the toxins leave your body.

Another side effect is a feeling of disorientation when the massage is over (we call it massage drunk). You may be a little light headed and out of it. That’s very normal. Just sit in the lobby and drink some water until the feeling passes! You’ll usually be fine in 10 to 15 minutes.

Finally, a deep tissue massage will leave you dehydrated. That’s why your therapist gives you water when it’s over. It is very important to drink plenty of water after a therapeutic massage.

Lafayette Massage Therapy !

“Lafayette Massage Therapy”

337-909-0440

3205 Johnston st.

Lafayette La 70503

Massage therapy is a simple and effective way to improve physical and mental health. Sessions typically last from 15 to 90 minutes. There are many different types of therapeutic massage, some of which include:

  • Swedish massage – a classic form of massage that relaxes tense muscles and improves blood circulation. The skin and muscles in affected areas are gently stroked, kneaded, rubbed, tapped, and vibrated.
  • Manipulation – ligaments, tendons, and muscles are massaged, stretched, and moved to improve mobility and to relieve pain. It is often done in combination with physical therapy techniques.
  • Mobilization – focuses on moving the spine, joints, and muscles in the body to improve mobility, relax muscles, and improve posture. Like manipulation, it is done with physical therapy techniques.
  • Connective tissue massage – treats illnesses by relieving tension in connective tissue, which connects organs, muscles, and nerves together.
  • Deep tissue massage – treats the deeper layers of muscle by applying strong pressure to muscles and tendons.
  • Myofascial (trigger point) massage – pressure is specifically applied to pain-triggering points that are oversensitive, tense muscle tissue and adhesions of connective tissue. The idea of trigger points is controversial and myofascial massage may not be consistently effective .
  • Chinese traditional massage – moderate pressure is applied to certain acupoints of the body using rotating movements with fingertips; often done in combination with acupuncture
  • Shiatsu massage – a Japanese form of trigger point massage therapy that uses thumbs to massage acupuncture points.
  • Manual lymphatic drainage – encourages natural drainage of waste products from the lymph nodes.
  • Thai massage – involves stretching and pulling the limbs and applying strong, rhythmical pressure to the body with hands, elbows, knees, or feet. Focuses on manipulating “energy lines” (similar to acupuncture meridians) that run throughout the body to treat illnesses.
  • Ayurvedic massage – a traditional form of Indian medicine that involves gently massaging the body using rhythmical stroking movements and herbal oils.